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This is a beginning single-digit addition lesson

Subject:

Math  

Grade:

1  

Title – Addition
By – Miranda Constable
Primary Subject – Math
Grade Level – 1

Objectives:

      1) The student will be able to define terms (total number, add, addition, answer) of addition that help them solve the problem.

 

    2) The student will be able to add simple addition problems correctly.

Materials:

      Teacher:

15 Cookies, 2 baskets, marker, white board, worksheet copies

      Student:

Pencil Introduction:

      “Good Morning, boys and girls! I made some cookies last night. Do any of you like cookies? (

Response

      )
      I knew how much you like cookies, so I brought some to class with me. (

Show students the bag of cookies

      )
      There is only one problem! I know that we have five boys and eight girls in our class, but I don’t know how many cookies in total that I need so that I can give each one of you a cookie. How can I fix my problem? (

Allow responses, correct answer: Add

    )”

Transition:

    “Today we are going to learn how to add two numbers together to get one whole number.”

Sequence of Activities:

      “Okay! We have a cookie problem; we need to figure out how many students total are in our class so that we can have a cookie party. Do you have any suggestions about how we can find out the total number of students in our class? (

Hesitate and then ask the next question

      )
      Wait, what does total number mean? It means how many students we have in our class all together. We can find the total number of students in our class by adding the number of boys to the number of girls. When we add we are putting two groups or numbers together to get one number. Let me give you an example. I have 2 apples in this basket and 2 apples in the basket. (

Show students two baskets with apples in them

      ) How many apples do I have? (

No response necessary

      )
      What if I put all the apples in one basket and then I count them. (

Put all apples in one basket

      ) Now I have four apples all together. We just figured a problem using addition. When we add, we put two groups of numbers together to get one number. Now we can also do this problem if we write it like this 2 + 2 = 4. This is the same problem we just completed, but we are using numbers in our problem. We figure the problem the same way (

show students apples

      ) we have two apples here just like the first two in our problem, and then we have two apples here just like the next two in our problem. Now we have to find out how many total apples we have in our basket, so we count them (

count the apples to get the correct answer

      ); we have four apples. How did we get four apples? (

Response: we added the two groups together

      ) That is right we added the two groups of apples together to get one group for one answer.
      Now let’s see if someone can come up here and help me figure out this next problem. (

Have a student volunteer to help, use as many as time allows varying the problem for each student 3+2=5, 2+3=5, etc

      .) We have three apples in this basket (

write the three on the board

      ) and one in this basket (

write the one on the board

    ) How many apples do we have total? We have four apples total”.

Conclusion:

      “Wow, great job! Now let’s review what we have learned today. What does total number mean? (

The total number of objects we are counting

      )
      Why do we use addition? (

To add two groups together to find one answer

      )
      How do we find the answer to an addition problem? (

We add or count the object we are adding

      )
      You all have done a great job! We still have one problem to figure out! How many students are in our class? Let’s find the answer. (

Write the problem on the board

      ) We have five boys and eight girls, so we write the problem like this. (5 + 8 = ) Now lets count all the students in the room to get our answer. (

Count the students and get the answer

    ) We have thirteen students that want cookies in our classroom.”

Follow-up Activity:

    “Now each of you may have a cookie and complete this project. We are going to figure the answer to some problems. I will give you a worksheet that you will complete.” The student will answer nine problems correctly.

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