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Here students learn to recognize the writing trait of voice in books, music and art

Subjects:

Art, Language Arts, Music  

Grades:

5, 6, 7, 8  

Title – VOICE Writing Trait – Differentiated by Process of Learning Styles
By – Marilyn Scotto
Primary Subject – Language Arts
Secondary Subjects – Music, Art
Grade Level – 5 – 8

Topic:

    Voice, one of the 6 traits of writing differentiated by process of learning styles

Rationale:

    Students will learn to become better self-evaluators of their writing and better communicators through the written word.

Materials:

      Books:

Nancy Drew

        Vols. 1 & 2 by Carolyn Keene

Down the Yukon

        by Will Hobbs

Yukon

        by Anne Templeton Kluit

Monet

        by Jude Welton

 

      CD:

God Bless the U.S.A.

      -”I’m Proud to be an American” by Lee Greenwood
      Art: Student hallway art
    Also: Activity attachment, overhead, CD player

Learning Goals:

      Know Vocabulary:

      • voice, no voice

 

      Understand:

      • Students will understand that adding voice to their writing will create a more effective connection with their audience.

 

    Be Able to Do:

    • Note differences in voice vs. no voice pieces
    • See relationship of voice across varying mediums — books, music, art (differentiated by learning styles) .
    • add voice to non-voice pieces

Guiding Questions:

  • Who can tell me what voice means in writing (see activity sheet) ?
  • Give me an example of voice in writing (a favorite book, author) .
  • Compare these two books — which has voice and which has no voice? Why (adventure vs. textbook) ?
  • Listen to these two songwriters’ songs — compare/contrast (one is flat, the other inspiring/moving).
  • Observe this artist. How is his voice consistent with his paintings?
  • Walk into the hallway for a moment. How have the students here used voice in their artwork?
  • After activity ask, ” How has she/he used their voice in this piece?

Preparing to teach the lesson:

  • Materials present; overhead/CD player ready to play
  • Able to modify if necessary (words to song, guiding questions, etc.)
  • Be aware of time element
  • Be sure to pre-assess, during-assess and exit: through activity, review

Teaching the Lesson:

      1. Introduce the Six Traits of Writing – lead to “Voice”.

 

      2. Pre-assess – Ask for definition.

 

      3. Turn on overhead – continue with meanings of “Voice”.

 

      4. Give purposeful instruction. Tell students they will “come away today” knowing the meaning of voice through three different mediums/examples.

 

      5. Give examples:

 

        A) BOOKS -

Nancy Drew

        author Carolyn Keene — her writing voice.

 

        Read sample from book, one that elicits a page-turner response. Show another sample from a different book by the same author and compare.
        Show two examples books on the same topic (the Yukon). Students must decide (compare/contrast) which is the book with voice and the book with no voice.

 

        (

Yukon

        [textbook] vs.

Down the Yukon

        [adventure]).
        B) MUSIC – students are told that two songwriters were given the task to write a song about how they felt about being an American.

 

        First songwriter – read his flat, emotionless words (make this up).

 

        Second songwriter – play half of song,

I’m Proud to be an American

        by Lee Greenwood.

 

        Students compare/contrast same topic, different writing voices.
        C) ART – show students two paintings by Monet to illustrate writing with a paintbrush also elicits “Voice” – the similar voice Monet uses in all his paintings. Have students walk into the hallway to view students’ artwork on walls. Emphasize how individual and personal each piece is – it is “Voice”.

 

    6. During-assess: summarize before activity.

Activity:

      Students will choose one writing piece (see voice activity below) and add voice to it.

 

    Model one for them.

Debriefing:

    As they share their writings, comment on voice used.

Assessing the Activity:

      Authentic – activity sheet;

 

    exit strategy – ask students about their favorite authors/books and voice used (their textbooks, a weather report, etc.)

ELA Standards:

      Std. 1 – Information & Understanding

 

      Std. 2 – Literary Expression & Expression

 

    Std. 3 – Critical Analysis & Evaluation

Attachment


VOICE ACTIVITY:

Voice is *

      * you — coming through your writing

      * your own style, tone, and flavor

      * how you, the writer connects with the reader!

    * when your piece reaches out and “pulls-in” the reader.

Directions : Choose one of the following writings and add your own voice to it.
( I just had to add my comments — use as a rubric! )

1)

Today is your birthday. Have a Happy Day!
( I’m so not buying this “boring” greeting card. )

2)

“This whole week, I keep seeing these strange flashes of light outside my window. Oh well, maybe it’s just lightning,” thought Tom.
( I’m returning this book — it does not pull me in at all .)

3)

“Summer is here, not much to do.
I don’t really care — how ’bout you?”
( No way is this songwriter connecting with me — just not feeling
it, Dawg!
)

E-Mail Marilyn Scotto !

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