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Conclusion

Subject:

Language Arts  

Grades:

11, 12  

Title – Conclusion
By – Melanie Marchand
Primary Subject – Language Arts
Secondary Subjects – Language Arts
Grade Level – 11-12
Conclusion – Lesson 6

Short Story Unit Contents:

Overview: This is the final lesson of the unit and this time should be used to bring a sense of closure to the previous stories and concepts that have been introduced – the parts of the short story and the use of suspense/horror in writing – in keeping with the build up to Halloween.

Outcomes:
— Students will be able to identify the various ways in which writers use suspense to create an atmosphere for the writing.
— Students will be able to discuss the different aspects of short stories as discussed and featured in previous lessons.
— Students will be able to apply their knowledge in the continuation in preparation for their cumulative activity.

Procedures:
1. Take a moment to review the titles and plots of the stories previously discussed in class by placing the information on a chart or on the board. The key concepts might also be placed there in parenthesis (i.e. narrative voice, suspense, parts of the story, etc.)
2. Ask the students from a crafting viewpoint, which story do they feel drew best on the elements of suspense, horror, form/structure, etc., and why.
3. Alternately, ask if there were any of the aspects that they did not see well demonstrated in each of the various stories:
— Did an element of horror appear in the opening “Three Little Pigs” story?
— What made the style of Mark Twain different from that of Stephen King? How did a psychological element come into play in the Jackson, or the Connell? Which worked better, in your opinion?
— How is the structure of the story manipulated so that suspense is capitalised?
4. Use class time to work on the culminating activity. Students should be encouraged to use their peers as editors and critiques for the design of their “sequel” to match style, monitor pacing, and form final editing ideas. If desired, a small part of the mark could be given for the editorial participation.

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