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The Great Gatsby, 1920s, Magazine Description Continued

Subjects:

Language Arts, Social Studies  

Grades:

9, 10, 11, 12  

Title – The Great Gatsby, 1920s, Magazine Description Continued
By – Lori Gwinn
Primary Subject – Language Arts
Secondary Subjects – Social Studies, Language Arts
Grade Level – 9-12
The Great Gatsby and 1920s Unit Contents:
Great Gatsby Project Description
Magazine Project
Prohibition in the 1920s
1920s Trends – Fashion
The Automobile
Famous People from the 20s
The Jazz Age

Project Goal:

The class will work as a publishing team to create a magazine that highlights the 1920s in America and important events from The Great Gatsby.

Because most people in school today were not living during the 1920s, much of the information for this project will come from research. Articles will, however, contain information that is fictional. While students must base the majority of their writing on factual events and information, there is some freedom in this project to be creative and adventurous.

Every article that goes into the magazine must be typed. Students have both the media center and the computer lab scheduled for at least two class periods. Further, any student who finishes work early will be able to use classroom computers or the computer lab to continue work on the magazine.

Mrs. Gwinn will provide the notebook and page protectors students will use to assemble the magazine.

There will be a designated place in the library where print materials will be kept on reserve for student use. Most of these materials may be checked out for a restricted period of time.

Individual Responsibilities:

Each member of the class must submit a minimum of two articles in his or her subject area: trends of the 1920s, famous people, jazz music, the automobile, and prohibition.

These articles must include factual information that is obtained through research. This information must use parenthetical documentation. Further, the individual must submit a correctly formatted works cited entry to the magazine’s Works Cited page.

Each article must be accompanied by an illustration. The illustration may be copied and cut, hand drawn, or clip art. Students who want to use illustrations from the internet must pay for these illustrations to be printed in the media center, Mrs. Gwinn’s room, or the computer lab because printing these illustrations uses a tremendous amount of ink. (One full page=$1, half page=$.50)

Articles submitted without all of the requirements–research, documentation, an illustration, and works cited entry–will not receive full credit in grading.

Team Responsibilities:

Teams–trends, the automobile, prohibition, famous people, and jazz music–are responsible for making certain that each member of the team is on task during research. Further, teams are responsible for helping one another out with research questions, typing, illustrating, and writing. Teams must also make certain that all members submit at least two articles to the magazine. Each team is responsible for submitting at least four advertisements to the magazine. Ads must also be illustrated.

Production Company Responsibilities:

The class as a whole is responsible for the following: (1) creating a title for the magazine which relates to The Great Gatsby; (2) designing a cover for the magazine which relates to the title; (3) creating a table of contents; (4) formatting a Works Cited page which follows the guidelines found in Writer’s Craft on pages 290-294 (yellow edition). Students may also use The Rookie’s Guide to Research to find information on correctly documenting research.

The Great Gatsby and 1920s Unit Contents:
Great Gatsby Project Description
Magazine Project
Prohibition in the 1920s
1920s Trends – Fashion
The Automobile
Famous People from the 20s
The Jazz Age

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