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A great unit on Johnstown

Subjects:

Language Arts, Social Studies  

Grade:

6  


Title – Johnstown Unit
By – Kiley Zibert
Primary Subject – Language Arts
Secondary Subjects – Social Studies
Grade Level – Grade 6
Multicultural Education
Age Level: 6th Grade
Title: Johnstown Now & Then
Major Concepts: Current Events
Content: Social Studies

Rational:
The students are now at an age that they are able to look at two situations and they are able to see how they are similar and different. This lesson calls for them to compare and contrast issues that were important in Johnstown in 1889 and ones that are important in 2002. The students will have to analyze newspaper articles as well as to take what they have learned and create an essay of their own.

Objectives:

    • Students will learn how read newspaper articles for critical information.

    • Students will learn how to compare similar newspaper articles.

    • Students will learn how to contrast similar newspaper articles.

    • Students will construct a paper by comparing and contrasting an issue.

Materials:
Johnstown newspapers from 1889 and 2002.
Photographs of Johnstown from 1889 and 2002

Procedures:

Motivation:
A series of pictures showing Johnstown before, during, after the flood and present day. As well as the pictures several advertisements from the different newspapers showing how the prices have changed over time. The question will be posed. How much has Johnstown really changed?

Body of Lesson:

    • Students will be given a section of the newspaper from 1889. They will be instructed to read through several articles to see what were the current issues at the time.

    • Upon reading the articles the class will then lead a discussion about what they found to be important.

    • Students will be given a section of the newspaper from 2002. They will be instructed to read through several articles to see what the current issues are.

    • Upon reading the articles the class will then lead a discussion about what they found to be important.

    • Now as a class they will make a chart that compares and contrasts Johnstown on the board.

    • Once the list has been thoroughly completed the students will be instructed to the project at hand.

    • Students will be instructed to take two things from each category and write an essay showing the two sides of the story.

    • Over two days the essay will be written and peer edited.

Conclusion:
On a volunteer base several students will read their paper aloud. A closing discussion about the likes and dislikes will be done. Highlighting the main issues that compare and contrast the time periods.

Assessment:
Students will be assessed by how well they stay on task reading the newspaper articles as well as how they participate in the classroom discussion. The students will also be assessed on how they construct their essay and if they followed the instructions.

Multicultural Education
Age Level: 6th Grade
Title: Johnstown Now & Then
Major Concepts: Current Events
Content: Social Studies

Rational:
The students are now at an age that they are able to look at two situations and they are able to see how they are similar and different. This lesson calls for them to compare and contrast issues that were important in Johnstown in 1889 and ones that are important in 2002. The students will have to analyze newspaper articles as well as to take what they have learned and create an essay of their own.

Objectives:

    • Students will learn how read newspaper articles for critical information.

    • Students will learn how to compare similar newspaper articles.

    • Students will learn how to contrast similar newspaper articles.

    • Students will construct a paper by comparing and contrasting an issue.

Materials:

    • Johnstown newspapers from 1889 and 2002.

    • Photographs of Johnstown from 1889 and 2002

Procedures:

Motivation:
A series of pictures showing Johnstown before, during, after the flood and present day. As well as the pictures several advertisements from the different newspapers showing how the prices have changed over time. The question will be posed. How much has Johnstown really changed?

Body of Lesson:

    • Students will be given a section of the newspaper from 1889. They will be instructed to read through several articles to see what were the current issues at the time.

    • Upon reading the articles the class will then lead a discussion about what they found to be important.

    • Students will be given a section of the newspaper from 2002. They will be instructed to read through several articles to see what the current issues are.

    • Upon reading the articles the class will then lead a discussion about what they found to be important.

    • Now as a class they will make a chart that compares and contrasts Johnstown on the board.

    • Once the list has been thoroughly completed the students will be instructed to the project at hand.

    • Students will be instructed to take two things from each category and write an essay showing the two sides of the story.

    • Over two days the essay will be written and peer edited.

Conclusion:
On a volunteer base several students will read their paper aloud. A closing discussion about the likes and dislikes will be done. Highlighting the main issues that compare and contrast the time periods.

Assessment:
Students will be assessed by how well they stay on task reading the newspaper articles as well as how they participate in the classroom discussion. The students will also be assessed on how they construct their essay and if they followed the instructions.

Multicultural Education
Age Level: 6th grade
Title: Johnstown Now & Then
Major Concepts: Informing the Community
Content: English/Social Studies

Rational:
During this lesson students will be recapping what they have learned over the past two lessons and the one they are currently in. The students are going to make an attempt at changing an area of the community. The students will construct a newsletter while learning that the first step to change is informing people that there is a something that needs to be changed. The students will be taking an active role in their community and are beginning to see that they we all have the power to change things.

Objectives:

    • Students will learn how to construct a newsletter

    • Students will learn the first step to change is informing people that there is a problem.

    • Students will learn how to write a letter using proper business form and language.

Materials:

    • Several examples of newsletter

    • 1 ream of paper

    • Computer/Printer

    • Power Point Program

    • Projector

Procedures:

Motivation:
The teacher will say. You have now spent several weeks learning about Johnstown Before and After the Flood. During the fall of the steel industry and what the current issue are today in Johnstown. The step to change is making people aware that there is a problem. So today you are going to inform the community about what you have learned. Show them where some problems are and how we can change it. Also show them the positive things in Johnstown. A power point presentation will also be constructed to show a variety of newsletters and information on how to setup a newsletter.

Body of Lesson:

    • Students will go into the groups of four to draft part of the newsletter. Each group will be assigned one of theses categories flood, steel mill, housing and what to change.

    • Once in the groups the students will turn their attention to the teacher and the examples of newsletters. The class as a whole will go over how their part of the newsletter should be written.

    • Students then will work in their groups to create the letter.

    • After several revisions and a meeting with the teacher a final written copy will be done.

    • Once all groups have their final copies they will read them aloud to the class.

    • After they are read the class as a whole will write and introduction and a conclusion to the newsletter.

    • After that is completed one person from each group will be selected to type up the newsletter

    • Those four students will type and set up the newsletter.

    • Once the newsletter is completed copies will be mailed out to the mayors and other figureheads as well as business owners and parents.

Conclusion:
An overall discussion will take place as to what they feel they have gained from the experience. Things like whether or not it was going to change anything by writing the newsletter and if they feel it was worthwhile to spend this time learning about their town and its’ history.

Assessment:
Students will be assessed by how well they stay on task while working in groups. They also will be assesses on how well they participate in the writing of the newsletter and their involvement in the discussion of how to change the community.

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