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Writing About The Holocaust, Writing A Narrative

Subjects:

Language Arts, Social Studies  

Grade:

6  

Title – Writing About The Holocaust, Writing A Narrative
By – Kristy Brooten
Primary Subject – Language Arts
Secondary Subjects – Social Studies
Grade Level – 6
Writing About The Holocaust Thematic Unit Contents:

Lesson Plan 2

Grade level: 6
Concept being taught: Writing a narrative

I. Objectives
TSWBAT write a narrative story about someone involved in the Holocaust

II. Materials
The Number on My Grandfather’s Arm, “What Makes a Story a Story?” overhead, sentence overhead

III. Detailed Lesson Outline
D. Motivation
Read The Number on My Grandfather’s Arm to the class. As I read, think about how this form of writing is different from the form of writing we looked at last time (research report).

E. Input
What differences did you hear? How did you feel after hearing this story? How did you feel after reading the informational reports about the Holocaust? What kinds of language usage were in this story that weren’t in the reports? What does a story have that a report doesn’t?
What makes a story a story? Record students’ ideas on overhead. Suggest description, dialogue, characters, plot, specific setting if not suggested by students.
Let’s take a closer look at some of these elements. Why do think description is important in a story? (Help reader to picture, feel, hear, taste and feel what is being described)
Read sentence from story (on overhead): When Grandpa was young, he lived in a small village in Eastern Europe. I asked Grandpa about the village and he told me, “It was in the mountains. There was a lake near us. I swam in it with my friends.”
How can we make these sentences more descriptive? Work with your partner to rewrite these sentences, adding description. Share new sentences with class.
Try these sentences (on overhead): I was in one of them, Auschwitz. It was surrounded with a high fence. On top of that fence was barbed wire. There were guards with guns. There was no way out of that camp. Work with your partner to rewrite these sentences, adding description. Share new sentences with class.
Let’s go back to our list. Another important element of a story is dialogue. What dialogue can you remember from the story? Read page 5 of Number. How else could the author have said this, without using dialogue? Would it have the same effect? How does dialogue add to the experience of reading a story? What’s different about the way dialogue looks? How do we punctuate dialogue?
Let’s practice writing some dialogue of our own. Read sentence (on overhead): He saw my parents were in a hurry so he said he’s wash the dishes. How can we turn this statement into dialogue? Work with your partner to rewrite these sentences, adding dialogue. Share with class and have one or two write new sentence(s) on board.
Practice with one more (read off of overhead): When Grandpa was young, he lived in a small village. Work with your partner to rewrite this sentence, adding dialogue. Share with class and have one or two write new sentence(s) on board.
Where do you think this author began when he wrote this story? What was his main idea? To write our own stories about the Holocaust, where would we begin? Brainstorm ideas: in your table groups, brainstorm together about possible ideas for a story (remember the research you’ve done so far about the Holocaust). Share ideas with class and write on board. Pick one of these ideas or another one that you’d like to write about and write it down.
What do you think the author might have done next? Refer back to What makes a story a story? Each of our stories will need to contain these elements. Where and when will your story take place? Who are the characters? What will your story be about? What will happen to the characters/what will they do? Jot down your thoughts and ideas. (If stuck, think about Number and its characters, basic plot, setting, etc.)

F. Closure
Share your ideas with your neighbor. Do you have all of the things needed for a story? If not, give each other suggestions. Where might you be able to incorporate description and dialogue into your story? Together, write some sample sentences of description and dialogue that would fit into your story.

G. Evaluation
Give students time to begin writing their story in their Holocaust Journals. To evaluate the objective, walk and around and ask students to share their ideas with you, looking for the main idea, characters, plot, setting, samples of description and dialogue, etc.

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