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This “Complete Me” decimal game teaches how decimals can be added together to form a whole

Subject:

Math  

Grades:

3, 4, 5, 6, 7  

Title – Decimal Game ‘Complete me’
By – David Brown
Primary Subject – Math
Grade Level – 3-7

Description:

    This decimal game teaches how decimals can be added together to form a whole.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understanding of how decimal numbers can fit together to make a whole
  • Understanding of the difference in size of decimal places.
  • Understanding relationship between fractions and decimals.

Required Material:

  • White board
  • White board Marker

Aim of the game:

  • Fill in the whole shape by shading a specified fraction of it.
  • The winner is the person who shades the final segment and creates a whole.

How to Play:

  1. This game can either be played in pairs with each person playing against each other or as the teacher verses the class.
  2. Start by drawing a whole circle, square or shape of your choice on the white board.
  3. Select three or more decimal numbers that each player can choose from (depending on what decimal numbers you choose will determine how difficult the game will be, but stick to relatively easy ones that correspond with a known fractions (0.5 = 1/2, 0.25 = 1/4, 0.375 = 3/8).
  4. Each player takes turns choosing which fraction of the whole shape to fill by picking the corresponding decimal place.
  5. The player who fills in the last piece to complete the whole is the winner. If the player has no choice but to fill in more than a whole, then that player loses (if there is only 0.125 left, but the player can only choose from 0.5, 0.25 or 0.375).

Notes:

  • I would suggest easing into this game with simple decimals first (e.g. 0.5, quarter). Also, you might want to use fractions that fit in with each other (e.g. 0.125 0.25 0.75).
  • As the students get better at understanding decimals and fractions, you can give more difficult combinations.

For more free games visit:

E-Mail David Brown !

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