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8 days on Deafness and American Sign Language

Subjects:

Art, Language Arts, Math, Music, Social Studies  

Grades:

2, 3, 4  

Title – 8 days on Deafness and American Sign Language
By – Kindall Nelson
Primary Subject – Language Arts
Secondary Subjects – Math, Social Studies, Music, Art
Grade Level – 2-4

This is an integrated unit plan consisting of five classroom subjects that include Language Arts, Art, Music, Social Studies and Math. While this plan may be changed to fit a particular classroom, I left it in its current form because I actually created and used this unit plan during my classroom time this semester. I did not use any lessons found on lesson plan sites.

My original plan was to teach the students to understand deafness in terms of physical differences, cultural differences, and American Sign Language. As I worked through the exploration, I began to see where other subjects could be added to help the students tie in regular subjects with American Sign Language. A large part of my plan was to help the students understand that the only difference between a deaf and hearing person, is their mode of communication. So, I was able to further my point by using other subjects, because it proved to the children that the deaf use all of the other subjects also. Deaf children are just like them, they just can’t hear.

Because this is an integrated lesson that includes something that the children have never learned before, the normal “titles” or “sections” of the lesson plan do not accurately describe some of the activities. Still, for the sake of format, I will leave them in wherever possible.

Also, I realize that many classrooms do not have the same amount of available time every day. So, these lessons may need to be modified if a lesson runs longer than possible one day and too short another.


DAY ONE

Behavioral Objectives:

  • The students will understand what Deafness is.
  • The students will be able to demonstrate the manual ASL alphabet.
  • The students may begin to grasp the idea that Deafness is not a barrier to all things.

Illinois Learning Standards.

      4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve comprehension.
      4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
      4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
      4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
      25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow
      tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and
      different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
      27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.
      26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and
      create simple dance sequences.
      26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles.

Teaching Methods: Direct instruction, class work, brainstorming

Statement of objectives:
“Today, and for the next five lessons that I teach, we are going to learn about American Sign Language and about Deaf people.”

Opening activity: (20 Minutes) Direct Instruction

American Sign Language is a way that Deaf people can communicate with each other and with us. ASL does not translate to English word for word. Like any other language, there are many differences between the words I’m signing in ASL and the words I’m saying in English.

When you were learning about English and how to read it and how to speak it correctly, what is the first thing you learned about? (Alphabet) Well, that’s where we are going to start with ASL also! Now, when we talk in English, do we ever spell out our sentences to each other? (May be some confusion… I followed up with..) What if I walked in here to teach and I said this… “G-O-O-D-M-O-R-N-I-N-G-C-L-A-S-S” Would you understand what I was saying? (No) In the same way, we don’t just use the alphabet for ASL.

Learning the alphabet helps us learn other signs because many signs use the first letter of the word as part of the sign. For example, toilet is a wiggling “t”. Most of the days of the week are their first letters in a little circle (show them “Monday”).

Let’s go through the Alphabet together. Go through slowly, make sure to keep an eye on all students to confirm they sign the letter correctly.

First Activity: (3 minutes) Brainstorming

Brainstorm on board: “What things can Deaf people not do?” All things will pertain to hearing. Make sure you point that out and remind them that just because someone is different it does not mean we should treat them differently.

Second activity: (10 Minutes) Class work

Read from Sign, Dance & Sign book about Johnnie and her singing. Explain that one does not have to be deaf to use ASL. Teach them the chorus that consists of “I Love to sign”. Pass out sheet with words on it and play CD. Students may sing along and dance as long as they stop and sign during the chorus.

Guided Practice:
The guided practice here is part of the lesson. The students watch me model signs, and then I help them as we go through the alphabet or the song.

Independent Practice:
I tell students to remember that they have these sheets that I handed out and that it would be a good idea to practice their alphabet between now and the next lesson.

Preview:
I tell them that next time we are going to learn more about how the Deaf listen to music and read a book about a deaf boy who is their age.

Assessment:
All assessment done in this lesson is purely visual. I watch to see where the students are and if they seem to understand what we are talking about. I did have to slow down the learning of the alphabet because many students didn’t understand which fingers went where. More assessment will come later in the unit.

List of materials:

  • Book and CD set “Sing, Dance, and Sign”
  • CD player
  • copies of Alphabet demo page (printed off of the internet
  • copies of song lyrics (types on my computer

Modifications for Special Needs:
Mainly, the only modifications I had to make were for more time for those who were not understanding the hand shapes.

Backup activities:
If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song.


DAY TWO

Behavioral Objectives:

  • The students will understand how Deaf people listen to music.
  • The students will be able to demonstrate the manual ASL alphabet.
  • The students will continue to gain a grasp on the idea that Deafness is not a barrier to all things.

Illinois Learning Standards.

      2.B.1a Respond to literary materials by connecting them to their own experience and communicate those
      responses to others.
      4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve
      comprehension.
      4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
      4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
      4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
      16.B.1 (W) Explain the contributions of individuals and groups who are featured in biographies, legends,
      folklore and traditions.
      18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as
      expressions of culture.
      25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow
      tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and
      different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
      26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and
      styles.
      26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and
      create simple dance sequences.
      27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.

Teaching Methods: Direct instruction, class discussion

Review:
Who can tell me what we learned last time about Deaf people? What is the name of the language they use to communicate? Can Deaf people listen to music? How? Practice signs from previous day.

Statement of objectives:
“Today we are going to continue to learn about American Sign Language and about Deaf people.”

Opening activity: (10 Minutes)

“Let’s go through the Alphabet together. Don’t rush, I want to be sure that everyone is getting the right hand shapes.” Go through slowly, make sure to keep an eye on all students to confirm they sign the letter correctly.

First activity: (15 Minutes) Direct Instruction

Read book “Moses Goes to a Concert”. Stop on pages with examples of sign and sign the examples to the class.

Guided Practice (5 minutes) Class Discussion

Talk about feeling the vibrations of the music like the children and the percussionist in the book. Blow up a balloon and let the children take turns holding it near the speaker while some music plays. When they sit down, ask they what they felt and talk about other ways to feel vibrations (through feet, in the body, in your head, etc).

Independent Practice:

I tell students to remember that they have these sheets that I handed out and that it would be a good idea to practice their alphabet between now and the next lesson.

Enrichment Activity:

Tell the students to take a moment to try to feel the vibrations of sounds between now and the next lesson. This could be in the car, or near their TV, at a concert, or anywhere that they hear music.

Preview:

I tell them that we are going to do some writing about ASL during the next lesson and we are going to learn more of our song.

Assessment:

Most assessment done in this lesson is purely visual. I watch to see where the students are and if they seem to understand what we are talking about. I did have to slow down the learning of the alphabet because many students didn’t understand which fingers went where. I also get a good idea of whether or not the class understands yesterday’s concepts by their answers and demeanor during the review. More assessment will come later in the unit.

List of materials.

  • Book and CD set “Sing, Dance, and Sign”
  • CD player
  • copies of Alphabet demo page (printed off of the internet)
  • copies of song lyrics (typed on my computer)
  • Book “Moses Goes to a Concert” by Isaac Millman

Modifications for Special Needs:
Mainly, the only modifications I had to make were for more time for those who were not understanding the hand shapes. I also had to take a time-out to explain the difference between DEAF and DEATH do to the large number of student with lisps in the class.

Backup activities:
If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song as it is one of the children’s favorite activities.


DAY THREE

Behavioral Objectives:

  • The students will write some things they know about ASL and the Deaf.
  • The students will be able to demonstrate the manual ASL alphabet.
  • The students will continue to gain a grasp on the idea that Deafness is not a barrier to all things.
  • Students will increase their ASL vocabulary.

Illinois Learning Standards.

      3.A.1 Construct complete sentences that demonstrate subject/verb agreement; appropriate
      capitalization and punctuation; correct spelling of appropriate, high frequency words; and appropriate use of the eight parts of speech.
      4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve
      comprehension.
      4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
      4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
      4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
      25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
      26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and create simple dance sequences.
      26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
      27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.

Teaching Methods: direct instruction, seatwork

Review: Who can tell me what we learned last time about Deaf people? What is the name of the language they use to communicate? Can Deaf people listen to music? Did any do what I suggested and try to feel music yesterday? Practice signs from previous day.

Statement of objectives:
“Today we are going to continue to learn about American Sign Language and about Deaf people. We are going to go through the alphabet like we always do. Then, we are going to do some writing after we finish working on our song.”

Opening activity: (3 Minutes)
“Let’s go through the Alphabet together. Don’t rush, I want to be sure that everyone is getting the right hand shapes.” Go through slowly, (although you can go a little faster than last time) make sure to keep an eye on all students to confirm they sign the letter correctly.

First activity: (5-7 Minutes) Direct Instruction
Teach new words to chorus of song. Sing, Dance and Sign it!

Second Activity: (20 minutes) Seat Work

Give students a worksheet where they can fill in their own answers to your questions. My worksheet was as follows:

If I were Deaf, I could not ___________________.
If I were Deaf, I could still ___________________.
I would like to know how to say __________________ in ASL.
So far, I have learned _________________________________. (finish the sentence and write 1-2 more)

Guided Practice

Both the review of the alphabet and the signing of the song are guided practice.

Independent Practice:

The writing assignment is independent practice.

Preview:

I tell them that by our next lesson I will learn the signs for the words that they wrote on their worksheets and we will all learn how to say everyone’s words. We will also learn more about Deaf education by reading another book about Moses.

Assessment:

Most assessment done in this lesson is purely visual. I watch to see where the students are and if they seem to understand what we are talking about. I did have to slow down the learning of the alphabet because many students didn’t understand which fingers went where. I also get a good idea of whether or not the class understands yesterday’s concepts by their answers and demeanor during the review. More assessment will come later in the unit.

List of materials.

  • Book and CD set “Sing, Dance, and Sign”
  • CD player
  • copies of Alphabet demo page (printed off of the internet)
  • copies of song lyrics (typed on my computer)
  • worksheets to hand back
  • copies of finished worksheets to keep for myself
  • ASL Dictionary to look up signs you don’t know

Modifications for Special Needs:

Mainly, the only modifications I had to make were for more time for those who were not understanding the hand shapes.

Backup activities:

If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song as it is one of the children’s favorite activities.


DAY FOUR

Behavioral Objectives:

  • The students will continue to increase their vocabulary.
  • The students will be able to make short sentences using the ASL vocabulary.
  • The students will be able to demonstrate the manual ASL alphabet.
  • The students will continue to gain a grasp on the idea that Deafness is not a barrier to all things.

Illinois Learning Standards.

      2.B.1a Respond to literary materials by connecting them to their own experience and communicate those
      responses to others.
      4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve
      comprehension.
      4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
      4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
      4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
      16.B.1 (W) Explain the contributions of individuals and groups who are featured in biographies, legends,
      folklore and traditions.
      18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as
      expressions of culture.
      25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow
      tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
      26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and
      create simple dance sequences.
      26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
      27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.

Teaching Methods: Direct instruction

Review: Who can tell me what we learned last time about Deaf people? What is the name of the language they use to communicate? Can Deaf people listen to music? How? What do we remember about the little Deaf boy Moses? Practice signs from previous day.

Statement of objectives:

“Today we are going to continue to learn about American Sign Language and about Deaf people. I have another story about Moses. This one will help us understand what his school is like.”

Opening activity: (5 Minutes)

“Let’s go through the Alphabet together. Don’t rush, I want to be sure that everyone is getting the right hand shapes.” Go through slowly, (although you can go a little faster than last time) make sure to keep an eye on all students to confirm they sign the letter correctly.

First activity: (10 Minutes) Direct instruction

Sign the list of words that the students came up with on their worksheets. We learned dance, basketball, “we support our troops”, and several others.

Second Activity: (15 Minutes) Direct instruction

Read book “Moses Goes to School”. Stop on pages with examples of sign and sign the examples to the class.

Third Activity: (5 minutes)

Learn new part of song and sing and sign the whole thing.

Guided Practice: Opening activity

Independent Practice:

I tell students to remember that they have these sheets that I handed out and that it would be a good idea to practice their alphabet between now and the next lesson.

Preview.

I tell them that we are going to learn about numbers during the next lesson and we are going to learn more of our song.

Assessment.

Most assessment done in this lesson is purely visual. I watch to see where the students are and if they seem to understand what we are talking about. I did have to slow down the learning of the alphabet because many students didn’t understand which fingers went where. I also get a good idea of whether or not the class understands yesterday’s concepts by their answers and demeanor during the review. More assessment will come later in the unit.

List of materials.

  • Book and CD set “Sing, Dance, and Sign”
  • CD player
  • copies of Alphabet demo page (printed off of the internet)
  • copies of song lyrics (typed on my computer)
  • Book “Moses Goes to School” by Isaac Millman
  • Graded copies of finished worksheet

Modifications for Special Needs:

Mainly, the only modifications I had to make were for more time for those who were not understanding the hand shapes. I also had to take a time-out to explain the difference between DEAF and DEATH do to the large number of student with lisps in the class and those sitting near them.

Backup activities:

If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song as it is one of the children’s favorite activities.


DAY FIVE

Behavioral Objectives:

  • Students will demonstrate the way music can be represented visually as opposed to hearing it or feeling the vibrations.
  • Students will begin to gain an understanding of the way colors and pictures correlate with music.

Illinois Learning Standards.

      4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve comprehension.
      4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
      4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
      4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
      18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture.
      25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
      25.A.1d Visual Arts: Identify the elements of line, shape, space, color and texture; the principles of repetition and pattern; and the expressive qualities of mood, emotion and pictorial representation.
      25.B.1 Identify similarities in and among the arts (e.g., pattern, sequence and mood).
      26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and create simple dance sequences.
      26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
      26.B.1d Visual Arts: Demonstrate knowledge and skills to create visual works of art using manipulation, eye-hand coordination, building and imagination.
      27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.

Teaching Methods: Direct Instruction, Discovery Learning

Review (5 Minutes)

Review signs from yesterday. Talk about Moses’ school. Ask them if ASL translates directly to English.

Talk about how Deaf people can “hear” music.

Statement of objectives:

Today we are going to talk about the way we can see music as opposed to hearing it or feeling the vibrations.

Opening activity: (5 Minutes) Direct Instruction

“Let’s go through the Alphabet together. Don’t rush, I want to be sure that everyone is getting the right hand shapes.” Go through slowly, (although you can go a little faster than last time) make sure to keep an eye on all students to confirm they sign the letter correctly.

First activity: (10-12 Minutes) Discovery Learning

“While Deaf people can feel the music through vibrations, there are also other ways that we could use to help the Deaf understand music.” Go on to explain how lights and colors can tell someone about the music they are listening to without hearing it. Make a videotape of some parts music videos from television. Play them with no volume and have the children guess by the colors and the lights what type of song they think it is (fast, slow, country, pop).

Second Activity: (10-12 Minutes)

Play classical music and have students draw pictures of what the music sounds like to them. Give them ideas about appropriate colors and textures for different types of music.

Third Activity: (5 minutes)

Learn new part of signing song and sing and sign the whole thing.

Guided Practice: See First Activity

Independent Practice: See Second Activity

Preview: “Tomorrow we are going to talk about numbers in ASL.”

Assessment: Drawing will be assessed to make sure students understand the concept of representing music visually.

List of materials.

  • Paper
  • Crayons
  • Classical CD
  • CD Player
  • TV
  • VCR
  • Tape made of music videos

Modifications for Special Needs: Time is the most significant modification for special needs.

Backup activities:

If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song as it is one of the children’s favorite activities.


DAY SIX

Behavioral Objectives:

  • Students will be able to count in ASL.
  • Students will be able to give the ASL answer to simple math problems that are given in ASL.

Illinois Learning Standards.

      4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve comprehension.
      4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
      4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
      4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
      6.B.1 Solve one- and two-step problems with whole numbers using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.
      8.A.1b Solve simple number sentences (e.g., 2 + o = 5).
      8.D.1 Find the unknown numbers in whole-number addition, subtraction, multiplication and division situations.
      25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
      26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and create simple dance sequences.
      26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
      27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.

Teaching Methods: Class directed, Direct Instruction

Review Class Directed

Take a minute to look at everyone’s pictures from the day before (you should probably hang them somewhere). Talk about the differences and similarities of the pictures.

Statement of objectives:

“We talked about Moses and his day at a Deaf school. You may remember that he had to go to different subjects just like you. One thing you have in common with Moses is that you both take math. Today we are going to learn about numbers in ASL, and we will learn to count to twelve and solve math problems.”

Opening activity: (5 Minutes)

“First, let’s go through the Alphabet together. Don’t rush, I want to be sure that everyone is getting the right hand shapes.” Go through slowly, (although you can go a little faster than last time) make sure to keep an eye on all students to confirm they sign the letter correctly.

First activity: (10 Minutes) Direct Instruction

Teach the students the signs for the numbers 1-12, plus, minus, and equals

Second Activity: (10 Minutes)

Sign math problems, have the students sign the answers back. Include problems with “6″ and “3″ as these are the two the students will confuse the most. Also, try mixing the problems up a bit. For example, sign “4 + what = 7?”

Third Activity: (5 minutes)

Learn new part of signing song and sing and sign the whole thing.

Guided Practice: See activities 1 and 2.

Independent Practice: Remind children to take home #’s page to practice their new numbers.

Preview: Tomorrow we are going to talk about Closed Captioning.

Assessment.

Most assessment done in this lesson is purely visual. I watch to see where the students are and if they seem to understand what we are talking about. Because the math problems are fairly simple, incorrect answers can tip the teacher off to confusion on the signs. I also get a good idea of whether or not the class understands yesterday’s concepts by their answers and demeanor during the review. More assessment will come later in the unit.

List of materials.

  • ASL paper with numbers on it (example attached)
  • CD
  • CD Player

Modifications for Special Needs:

Time is the most significant modification for special needs.

Backup activities:

If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song as it is one of the children’s favorite activities.


DAY SEVEN

Behavioral Objectives:

  • Students will be able to give three uses for closed captioning.
  • Students will be able to describe what closed captioning is.

Illinois Learning Standards.

      4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve comprehension.
      4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
      4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
      4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
      18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture.
      25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
      26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and create simple dance sequences.
      26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
      27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.

Teaching Methods: Direct Instruction

Review: Yesterday we talked about how Deaf students still need numbers because they need to do math just like us.

Statement of objectives:

Today, we are going to talk about something else that we all love to do, watch TV, and what things there are to help Deaf people do that also. We also have a video to watch of a Deaf person who wanted to prove that the Deaf can do anything that the hearing can do.

Opening activity: (5 Minutes)

Run through alphabet and numbers 1-12. Ask the students about other signs they remember from the lesson.

First activity: (10 Minutes)

  • Explain what closed captioning is and why it is used.
  • Explain how to read closed captioning and the symbols use in it (), musical note, : .
  • Give students other uses for closed captioning.
  • Help improve reading skills by watching your favorite cartoon with CC on.
  • Watch TV when the house is too noisy without turning the sound all of the way up.
  • Ask if they can think of other reason to use CC.
  • It would be best to use a children’s video to show examples of CC, because it is most likely to have sound effects, music, words, and other things that the students would want to know about for a CC lesson.

    Second Activity: (10 Minutes)

    This activity is centered around a videotape that the students watch. A lesson can be created from any tape the teacher can find. The one I used was an edited version of the interview with “Survivor Loser” Christy. She talked about why she did the Survivor show and what things happened there.

    Give the students signs to watch for and ask them to think about what she says and see if you remember learning anything in class about it. For example, my students looked for the words forest, monkey, and thank you. We also talked about what an interpreter is and why she needed one to be on the show. (She could talk, but someone had to sign to her what David Letterman was saying).

    Third Activity: (5 minutes)

    Should know all of the choruses to Sing ‘n’ Sign CD. Just go through the song. I do it every day because they all love it so much.

    Guided Practice: See Activities 1 and 2.

    Independent Practice: See Enrichment Activity

    Enrichment Activity:

    Go home tonight and find out if any of your televisions have CC on them. If your parents will let you, see if you can watch part of a show in CC.

    Preview: Tomorrow we are going to write letters about what we have learned in our Sign Language Lessons.

    Assessment.

    Most assessment done in this lesson is purely visual. I watch to see where the students are and if they seem to understand what we are talking about. I did have to slow down the learning of the alphabet because many students didn’t understand which fingers went where. I also get a good idea of whether or not the class understands yesterday’s concepts by their answers and demeanor during the review. More assessment will come later in the unit.

    List of materials.

    • TV
    • VCR
    • Video of Deaf person
    • Video to use for CC examples
    • CD
    • CD Player

    Modifications for Special Needs:

    Again, time is the most significant modification for special needs.

    Backup activities:

    If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song as it is one of the children’s favorite activities.


    DAY EIGHT

    Behavioral Objectives:

    • Students will write a letter telling that person the things they have learned in ASL.
    • Students will write the letter in correct letter form.

    Illinois Learning Standards.

        3.A.1 Construct complete sentences that demonstrate subject/verb agreement; appropriate capitalization and punctuation; correct spelling of appropriate, high frequency words; and appropriate use of the eight parts of speech.
        4.A.1b Ask questions and respond to questions from the teacher and from group members to improve comprehension.
        4.A.1c Follow oral instructions accurately.
        4.A.1d Use visually oriented and auditory based media.
        4.B.1b Participate in discussions around a common topic
        5.C.1a Write letters, reports and stories based on acquired information.
        25.A.1c Music: Identify differences in elements and expressive qualities (e.g., between fast and slow tempo; loud and soft dynamics; high and low pitch/direction; long and short duration; same and different form, tone color or timbre, and beat).
        26.B.1a Dance: Perform basic loco motor, non-loco motor movements and traditional dance forms and create simple dance sequences.
        26.B.1c Music: Sing or play on classroom instruments a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles.
        27.B.1 Know how images, sounds and movement convey stories about people, places and times.

    Teaching Methods: seatwork, class work

    Review:

    Ask the students what they liked best about the lessons on ASL and Deafness. Ask what they have learned. Ask if they would ever want to learn more.

    Statement of objectives:

    Today we are going to practice writing letters. We are each going to choose someone to write to and tell them what we have learned in our ASL lessons.

    Opening activity: (5 Minutes)

    Go through the Alphabet. Go through the numbers.

    First activity: (5 Minutes)

    Class work

    Sing and Sign song.

    Second Activity: (20 Minutes) Seat Work

    Have students write a letter to anyone they choose about the things they have learned in class. For time’s sake, I only asked for at least three complete sentences.

    Guided Practice:

        First Activity
        Independent Practice
        Second Activity

    Assessment:

    Letters will be graded based on correct letter form and content. The three complete sentences should be about the topic I gave them, not “How are you? I am fine. I like ASL.”

    List of materials.

    • Paper
    • Writing utensils
    • CD
    • CD player

    Modifications for Special Needs:

    Time is the most significant modification for special needs.

    Backup activities:

    If the activities had run short of my allotted time, I would have continued to work on the song as it is one of the children’s favorite activities.

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