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This lesson explores music and color and our feelings about each

Subjects:

Art, Language Arts, Music  

Grades:

K, 1, 2, 3  

Title – Music Makes Me Feel…
By – Jessica Colley
Primary Subject – Music
Secondary Subjects – Art, Language Arts
Grade Level – K-3

Objective:

    Students will be able to use different colors to draw pictures or write descriptions of how music makes them feel.

Materials:

  • My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss,
  • The Changing Colors of Amos by John Kinyon (available through www.amazon.com ),
  • crayons/markers,
  • paper,
  • classical music listening examples.

Lesson Length:

    Approximately 30 minutes, however you can choose to do more or less listening examples to shorten or lengthen the activity.

Procedure:

      Read

My Many Colored Days

      by Dr. Seuss to the class. Discuss the fact that Dr. Seuss feels different ways on different days and uses colors to help describe how he is feeling. However, colors feel different ways to different people. Read

The Changing Colors of Amos

      by John Kinyon for an example of how colors feel differently. Discuss with students how specific colors make them feel.
      Discuss with class that music makes us feel different ways, too. Music that sounds happy to one person may bring back sad memories for another. Tell students they will be listening to music and drawing pictures or writing words to describe how the music makes them feel.
      Play varied examples of classical music for students while they color. I print the title and composer at the bottom of the page. You can do several different examples and create a book

Music Makes Me Feel…

    . Some listening examples I like to use are “Moonlight Sonata, 1st Movement” by Beethoven, “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, 1st Movement” by Mozart, “Also Sprach Zarathustra” by Ricard Strauss, and “Hallelujah (from Messiah)” by Handel.

Assessment:

    Ask the students to tell what they drew and how they felt.

E-Mail Jessica Colley !

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