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This empowering lesson plan utilizes an economically-centered African American board game

Subjects:

Social Studies, Other  

Grades:

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12  

Title – Empowering African American Board Game
By – Norwood Professionals
Primary Subject – Other
Secondary Subjects – Social StudiesĀ 
Grade Level – 3-12

The following lesson plan is recommended for students 8 to 18, instructors should tailor the plan to meet the particular needs of his/her target group(s).

What will students learn:

  • to identify cultural signs and symbols that relate to our ancient history,
  • to identify and analyze basic elements of ethical business practices in order to apply them to the real life situations,
  • to understand and experience that ‘winning’ does not necessitate ‘destruction’ of others,
  • to practice the concept of cooperative economics,
  • how their academic achievement relates to empowerment of their community,

    Items needed to implement lesson:

  • Prosperity games (one game for each group of 4 students),
  • reference material about African American academic, business, social and political success,
  • pre- and post-activity student questionnaires.

    Academic goals:

    Grade level: 4-6
    Subject area(s): Business (civics), Graphic Art, Math, and History

    Primary Focus:
    Understand how African Americans in business play a vital role in our [capitalistic] society.

    Goals:
    Appreciate the colors, font types, font sizes, pictures, picture frames, backgrounds, box shapes and other graphics used in game production. Appreciate mathematical calculations (addition, subtraction, division, multiplication and percentage), and various currency denominations used. Appreciate some of the historical images on the Prosperity currency as well as the historical significance of some of the player pieces.

    Grade level: 7-9
    Subject area: Business (entrepreneur), Social Studies, Political Science, and Education

    Primary Focus:
    Understand and value different professional relationships, appreciate how various relationships relate to one another throughout life.

    Goals:
    Learn the difference between various types of businesses (profit, non-profit) and basic forms of ownership (sole-proprietorship, partnership, corporation). Connect academic achievement to social and political power. Encourage students to mentor/teach/supervise younger students.

    Grade level: 10-12
    Subject area: Business (law), Professional ethics, Math, Social Studies, Political Science, and Education

    Primary Focus:
    Understand how structure, organization, order, rules, and laws govern the fundamental operation of our society. Understand how having Blacks in key positions impact African American success on every level.

    Goals:
    To create ‘win-win’ deals, to form mutually lucrative partnership, to operate cooperatively with competitors such as to increase benefits to all involved. To increase the overall speed of game play with: memorization of ones prices for goods and services, being mindful of ones financial position, constant anticipation of possible deals, and sole use of mental calculations.

    The Lesson:

    Before you introduce Prosperity examine the overall mindset of your class with the Pre-Activity Student Questionnaire.


    I. Pre-Activity Student Questionnaire

    1. Using five of the following eight words, write a sentence (up to 15 words) about African Americans.

    intelligent / strong / wealthy / success / work / goals / motivation / no

    2. What is your culture, how does it relate to your nationality, and how are they important to your personal and professional development?

    3. Name all of the board games, card games, street games, or other type of games that reflect aspects of your culture, your people, your country, and/or your history?

    4. List up to seven games you have played; which one do you like most and why?

    5. How does your favorite board games relate to real life in the following areas:

        a) your relationship with family, and friends,

        b) your role in society, and

      c) the necessity for structure, understanding, and achievement.

    II. Activity:

    1. Participate — Explain the importance of physical play, and communal entertainment. Ask students to identify four street games, three card games, and two board games that have great appeal in the African American community. Discuss the meaningful and superficial aspects of each game.

    Ask students to identify and discuss games that appear to condone destructive behavior.

    2. Purpose — Open one Prosperity game set, ask students to identify different parts of the game. Talk about individual player pieces, and images on Prosperity currency. Examine city locations on game board, ask students to determine how such locations relate to Black America. Identify and discuss different terms used for ‘demand for payment’ (bill, invoice, fee, etc.) Discuss primary and secondary goals of the game. Distinguish, and discuss, the meaningful and superficial aspects of the game. How do game items and game goals reflect Black empowerment?

    Ask students to hypothesize why the game’s creator might have designed the game and its components the way he did

    3. Power — How do the words prosperity, wealth, success, family, and fun, serve to motivate towards or inspire goal achievement? How may the use of Prosperity translate into better grades in school and greater appreciation of Black life in America?

    Having discussed the importance of an empowered Black community; how does Prosperity relate to cultural identity, academic achievement, religious liberty, legal rights, financial independence, and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans?

    4. Play — Divide the class into groups of four, encourage each group to name themselves. Using the Quick Start rules allot 90 minutes for play. Special Note: although accurate record keeping is necessary as it concerns condemnation, mortgages, and partnerships, for most situations approximations, mental calculations, fairness, and cooperation should be the guiding rule. This method of play leads to faster transactions, sharper minds, and more fun.

    5. Progress — Allow at least 6 hours of cumulative play before administering part ‘b’ of the student questionnaire.

    Instructors may evaluate group performance on:

        a) how efficiently and effectively they carry out transactions,

        b) how they maximize the individual skills of players for greater overall group performance,

        c) on the types of deals structured,

        e) accuracy of mental calculations, and

      f) accurate record keeping, orderly physical appearance of area.

    Post Activity Student Questionnaire

    1. How does Prosperity relate to real life in the following areas:

        a) your relationship with family, and friends,

        b) your role in society, and

      c) the necessity for structure, understanding, and achievement.

    2. What is your culture, how does it relate to your nationality, and how are they important to your personal and professional development?

    3. Name all of the board games, card games, street games, or other type of games that reflect aspects of your culture, your people, your country, and/or your history?

    4. List up to seven board games you have played; which one do you like most and why?

    5. Using five of the following eight words, write a sentence (up to 15 words) about African Americans.
    intelligent / strong / wealthy / success / work / goals / motivation / no

    Comment:

    This lesson plan is endorsed by the publishers of Prosperity .

    E-Mail Norwood Professionals !

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