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This lesson plan also teaches the water cycle and the different states of water

Subject:

Science  

Grades:

4, 5  

 

Title – The Water Cycle
By – Emily
Primary Subject – Science
Grade Level – 4-5

This lesson plan teaches younger kids the water cycle and the different states of water.

You’ll Need:

      A large piece of paper

 

      Small paper squares (One for each student or group)

 

      Clear Plastic Cups (One for each student or group)

 

      Ice cubes

 

      A hot plate and pan or some way to boil water

 

      Plastic Wrap

 

    A bucket

Objective: The students should know the 3 states of water… liquid, gas, and solid. They should also know the water cycle… evaporation, condensation, etc.

On a large piece of paper draw a picture of the water cycle: A raining cloud with an arrow to a lake, then a sun with an arrow from the lake to the sun then back to the cloud. Also make small copies of this (on the paper squares) for the students or groups. Fill the plastic cups about halfway with water and place them on the student’s desk or the group’s area. Explain to the students that this is liquid water and this would be the rain and the water in the lake in the picture of the water cycle.

Heat some water up in the pan over the hotplate and let it boil. Explain to the students that the steam is water in the form of gas.

Give each student some ice cubes and explain to the students that this is water in a solid state. Have them put the ice cubes in their cup of water. Let it sit for a few minutes while you fill the bucket with water and put plastic wrap over it. Put it in a sunny and warm place and let it sit overnight. The next day, you will see droplets of water on the bottom surface of the plastic wrap. Explain to the students that this is where the water has evaporated, then turned back to a liquid. Back to the plastic cups… When the cups start ‘sweating’ explain to the students that this is condensation.

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