This username and password
combination was not found.

Please try again.

okay

view a plan

 Rate this Plan:

Here the difference between voting in 1800 and the importance of voting now is demonstrated

Subject:

Social Studies  

Grade:

2  

Title – Elections – Voting
By – Sara Philbrick
Primary Subject – Social Studies
Grade Level – 2

1. Standard Objectives

      History SOL: Civics

      2.10 The student will explain the responsibilities of a good citizen, with emphasis on

    b) Taking part in the voting process when making classroom decisions

2. Performance Objectives

  • Students will be able to take part in the voting process when making classroom decisions
  • Students will be able to distinguish between three important years in voting history: 1800, 1860, and 1920.

3. Resources

  • Various trade books:
        Maestro, B. & Maestro G. (1996).

    The Voice of the People: American Democracy in Action.

        Lothrop, Lee, & Shepard Books: New York.
        Steins, R. (1994).

    Our Elections.

      The Millbrook Press: Brookfield, Connecticut.
  • Students Journals
  • Chalkboard and Chalk
  • Voting Cards

4. Instructional Procedures

      A. Readiness/Motivation

        (Allotted time — 10 minutes)

      • Read the book The Voice of the People: American Democracy in Action
      • Allow the candidates running for class office to speak one last time.

      B. Focus (Allotted time — 30 minutes)

      • The students will now vote for the presidential and vice presidential candidates on their voting cards; the teacher will give the students 1-2 minutes to make their decisions.
      • The teacher will explain to the students that they are going to have 3 different elections similar to elections throughout history.
      • The teacher will explain to the students that the candidates with the most votes in the final election will become the president and vice president of the classroom.
        • Election # 1– 1800
          • The teacher will collect all voting cards with blue dots and tally the votes on a chart on the chalkboard.
          • The teacher will then announce the winner of the 1st election.
        • Election # 2 — 1860
          • The teacher will collect all voting cards with red dots and tally the votes; the teacher will add these votes to the votes tallied in the first election and add them to the chart on the chalkboard.
          • The teacher will add the votes from the two elections and then announce the winner of the 2nd election.
        • Election # 3 — 1920
          • The teacher will collect all voting cards with white dots and tally the votes; the teacher will add these votes to the votes tallied in the second election and add them to the chart on the chalkboard.
          • The teacher will add the votes from the three elections and then announce the winner of the 3rd election.
      • The winner of the 3rd election will become the president and vice president of the classroom.
      • The teacher will explain to the students the relevance of each of the elections and the dates of the elections:
        • 1800 — Only men were allowed to vote in an election. Men were given the right to vote in the United States Constitution (but not if they were African American men).
        • 1860 — Men and African Americans (but not African American women) were allowed to vote in an election. African Americans were allowed to vote after the Civil War through the 15th Amendment.
        • 1920 — Men, African Americans, and Women were now allowed to vote in an election. Women were allowed to vote after the Suffrage movement through the 19th Amendment.
      • ASSESSMENT –
        • Students will receive a matching worksheet in which they will match the correct date to the amendments and who was allowed to vote that year.

      C. Closure (Allotted time — 10 minutes)

      • The teacher and students will embark on a group discussion about the voting process and the fairness of the 3 elections that the class participated in.
      • The teacher will discuss with the students the importance of voting and the difference between voting in 1800 and voting now.
      • The teacher will ask the students questions to spark the students inquiry such as:
        • Were the 3 elections fair or unfair?
        • How were the elections (un)fair?
        • Which of the 3 elections do you think was the most fair? Why?
      • The teacher will ask this question to the students that weren’t allowed to vote in the first election. How did it make you feel that you wanted to vote, but your vote didn’t count in the election? How do you think people felt during this time? Was this fair that certain people weren’t allowed to vote?
      • Do you think that it is important to vote? If you were old enough to vote in an election, would you vote on November 2?
      • According to the Constitution, voting is a citizens most important “right”. Do you agree or disagree that voting is an important right as a citizen of a democracy in the United States.

      D. Follow-up/Enrichment

        (Allotted time– 5-10 minutes)

    • The students will respond in their journals about this voting activity. The students will respond as if they were living during the time period in which they were allowed to vote.
    • After the students write in their journals, the class will come together to discuss the students responses in their journals.

5. General Reflections on the Lesson

  • In order to account for diverse learning capabilities, teacher will provide proper wait time when facilitating discussion through questioning.

E-Mail Sara Philbrick !

Print Friendly