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This lesson on Tribes and Colonists involves a lot of student Research and develops Reading and Writing Skills

Subjects:

Language Arts, Social Studies  

Grades:

5, 6, 7  

Title – Tribes and Colonists
By – Christine Singley
Subject – Social Studies, Language Arts
Grade Level – 5-7
Description: This is designed to be a research unit to develop a variety of reading and writing skills.

Goals/Objectives:
-to learn that Native American Indian tribes were unique in their behavior and customs.
-to improve Internet research skills
-to improve note-taking skills
-to encourage the use of graphic organizers
-to engage in evaluative reading
-to engage in expository writing

Process learning objectives:
Questioning
Investigation
Collecting Data
Evaluation and Interpretation
Communication
Sequence
Oral and written expression
Attitude/teamwork
Cooperative group work

Lesson Stages: Before, During, and After
 
Useful Internet Resources:
 
NativeWeb
URL: http://www.nativeweb.org

Native Sources for KIDS
URL: http://www.pilmoth.org/kidspage.htm
 

American Indian Tribal Directory
URL: http://www.indians.org/ 

Village of First Nations
URL: http://www.FirstNations.com

Wampanoag Indians
URL: http://www.pilmoth.org/wamp.htm

Hobbamock’s Homesite
URL: http://www.pilmoth.org/hobbamoc.htm

First Nations History
URL: http://www.dickshovel.com/firstnations.html

Comments: This is a very thorough site featuring all types of arts, crafts, food, recipes, and games.

American Indian History Resources
URL: http://www.lang.osaka-u.ac.jp/~krkvls/history.html
Comments: This site provides an incredible number of links.

Procedure:

Before Reading
Step 1- Discuss the essential questions. Refer to these as students begin to read the materials. Explain all the tasks and discuss the products and rubrics.
Essential Questions
 1. What was life like for the Native Americans when the Colonists arrived?
2. What were the customs and beliefs of various tribes? How did these people live?
3. What were their interactions with the settlers? How did they feel about the settlers? Did these feelings change over time?
4. How were the tribes of the northern, southern, and middle colonies alike and different?
5. How did each of the three environments impact the behavior and customs of these tribes as well as the behavior of the colonists?

Step 2- Remind students that many Internet sites are used to complete this activity. It will take some time to locate all the information required to complete all the tasks.
Step 3- Review the following pre-reading strategy: text-preview
Step 4- Use the essential questions to get students talking about what they are going to read before they begin.
Step 5- Research teams begin.

Student Tasks
 
1. Research the Native American tribes that were present when the colonists arrived in this country. Select three tribes… one northern, one middle and one southern.
2. Collect information on the environment, villages, homes, clothes, food, weapons, behavior, customs, myths and beliefs for each of these tribes.
3. Use the chart to organize your information. You should have a column for each of the items described above.
4. Draw a picture of each village and home. Draw a portrait of a member of two different tribes.
5. Write two journal entries, each from the point of view of a member of the tribes you researched. Each must include detailed information gathered from your research. Each entry must be five paragraphs long.
6. Read at least three Native American Myths. Use a Double-Entry Response Journal for recording your reactions and the reactions from the point of view of a Native American. Pretend you are a child and this is a story you are hearing from the elders. How do you feel about the story contents? Use this position as a basis for your responses in the second column of the journal.

Daily Expectations
*Teachers may adapt the expectations to better suit the needs of your students.

Day One: Begin researching tribes/native groups from each of the three areas of the colonies. Start taking notes to respond to the questions of the unit.
 
Day Two: Continue researching. Begin to narrow selection to three tribes, one from the North, south and middle colonies. Start a draft of a chart to collect specific information listed in task #2 for these three tribes.
 
Day Three: Continue to complete chart draft. If ready, produce final, corrected copy of chart.
 
Day Four-Five: Complete chart and begin to organize drafts of creative writing exercise. Due dates should be set for each draft and final.
 
Day Six-Seven: Complete all writing, editing and produce final drafts of three writing assignments (task #5). Begin portraits of self and village for all three tribes. Due dates should be set for each portrait. Set up share day. Students may choose their favorite response to share with the class.
 
Share Day: Students will present their journal responses to the class. Students may opt to dress or provide other visuals for extra credit. Students should take notes regarding the authenticity of each presentation.

Journal Assignment

The Native American Experience
  Read and research about the three tribes you selected. Complete a chart of information including the surroundings, land forms, clothing, animals, plants, lifestyles, food, weapons, homes, customs, myths, legends and beliefs of each tribe.
Pretend you are a member of the tribe. Write a journal entry of at least five paragraphs. In each entry, use specific information from your chart to teach the reader everything you can about your people. What does your village look like? What do you wear? Where do you get your food? How do you interact with your environment?
Be very specific about your surroundings and the animals and plants within your tribal area. How do your people interact with the environment? How has the presence of the settlers changed your tribe? How does your tribe feel about the settlers?
Be creative. Tell a story. Use the charted information for the needed details, but use your imagination to weave the facts into a great tale for the reader. This entry should not sound like a report.

Rubric for Journal
I. Preparation and research
POINTS:
1 = few facts, little detail, inaccurate information
2 = more facts and information needed
3 = excellent research evidence, including facts and details.
 
II. Writing Task
POINTS:
1 = Spelling and Mechanical errors are evident. Little or No evidence of editing or proofreading by the student.
2 = Few errors in mechanics and spelling. Editing and proofreading evidence is adequate.
3 = No errors in mechanics and spelling. Excellent evidence of proofreading and editing.

Day One: Begin researching tribes/native groups from each of the three areas of the colonies. Start taking notes to respond to the questions of the unit.

Day Two: Continue researching. Begin to narrow selection to three tribes, one from the North, south and middle colonies. Start a draft of a chart to collect specific information listed in task #2 for these three tribes.

Day Three: Continue to complete chart draft. If ready, produce final, corrected copy of chart.

Day Four-Five: Complete chart and begin to organize drafts of creative writing exercise. Due dates should be set for each draft and final.

Day Six-X: Complete all writing, editing and produce final drafts of three writing assignments (task #5). Begin portraits of self and village for all three tribes. Due dates should be set for each portrait. Set up share day. Students may choose their favorite response to share with the class.

Share Day: Students will present their journal response to the class. Students may opt to dress or provide other visuals for extra credit. Students should take notes regarding the authenticity of each presentation.

Assessment:
A very general rubric is provided for the journal entries.

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