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This is a lesson on the book, “Johnny Appleseed,” and the man, John Chapman

Subjects:

Language Arts, Social Studies  

Grade:

2  

 

Title – Johnny Appleseed
By – Leigh Ann Kerby
Primary Subject – Social Studies
Secondary Subjects – Language Arts
Grade Level – 2nd Grade
Overview: Students will learn about the story of Johnny Appleseed. This book is written in rhyme and relates to the life of John Chapman. They will also write a poem or story that rhymes in their journal notebooks. The purpose of this lesson is to learn about an important man in history and his contribution to society.

Objectives:
Students will: l. Learn about an important person in
history
2. Recognize rhyming words
3. Participate in group discussion
4. Write a poem or story using rhyme

Materials: book – Johnny Appleseed by Reeve Lindberg.
Canada (1990)
chalkboard
student journals (notebooks)

Procedure

Introduction: Teacher will ask students if they have ever heard of a man named Johnny Appleseed. Explain that the name Johnny Appleseed is based on a real man named John Chapman. Tell students that they will be hearing the story of Johnny Appleseed and they will:

l. Recognize rhyming words
2. Discuss the story
3. Write a story or poem using rhyme

Main Activity
l. Preview the book. Show the cover. Introduce background information about John Chapman from the book.

2. Tell the students to listen for the rhyming words.

3. Point out special features in the pictures (log cabins, how people were dressed, etc.,)

4. After reading, discuss the book, Johnny’s contribution to history, and the differences in way of life then and now.

5. Go to the board and ask students to think of some words that rhyme. Write them on the board.

6. Ask students to write a poem or story using words that rhyme.

Closure/Conclusion
Ask students if they enjoyed the book. Ask them if what Johnny did was important to people today. Why or why not? Encourage students to read more books about important people in history.

Evaluation
Check journals to see if students understand the concept of rhyme. Give a short quiz on the book to assess their listening and comprehension skills.

Follow Up Lessons/Activities
After reading the book, take children on a field trip to an apple farm. Let them see how apples are grown and the many different kinds of apples. Read more books about important people in history.

E-Mail Leigh Ann Kerby !

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