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Karma Tycoon Video Game Study Guide Unit Cities and NonProfit Data

Subjects:

Language Arts, Math, Social Studies  

Grades:

7, 8, 9, 10  

Title – Karma TycoonVideo Game Study Guide Unit
Cities and NonProfit Data

Primary Subject – Social Studies
Secondary Subjects – Language Arts, Math
Grade Level – 7-10

A STUDY GUIDE
7) Cities and NonProfit Data

Grades 7-10

Karma Tycoon rocks the gaming world by offering you a thrilling ride through the world of social entrepreneurship as you earn Karma in virtual communities across the US.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Note:To access these unit chapters, click on their titles above.NonProfit Data 

a. CitiesATLANTA

  • Known as “The Big A” and the “World’s Next Great International City”
  • Overall population: 470,688 (as of 2005)
  • Senior population (65 years and over): 9.7% or 40,398 (as of 2000)
  • Youth population (18 and under): 22.3% or 92,874 (as of 2000)
  • Median household income: $34,770 (as of 1999)
  • Average temperature: 61.3 F
  • Homeless population: 42.7% (Georgia has the fifth highest homeless rate in the US.)
  • Sports teams: Atlanta Braves and Atlanta Falcons
  • Nonprofits:

CHICAGO

  • Known as “The Windy City,” the “City of Big Shoulders,” and “Chi-Town”
  • Overall population: 2,842,518 (as of 2005)
  • Senior population (65 years and over): 10.3% or 298,290 (as of 2000)
  • Youth population (18 and under): 26.2% or 758,756 (as of 2000)
  • Median household income: $38,625 (as of 1999)
  • Average temperature: 49.0 F
  • Homeless population: 73,656 (as of 2006)
  • Sports teams: Chicago Bulls, Chicago Bears, and Chicago White Sox
  • Nonprofits:
        Lincoln Park Zoo

    http://www.lpzoo.com/

        About Face Theatre

    http://www.aboutfacetheatre.com/

        Senior Net

    http://www.seniornet.org/php/default.php

        Street Level Youth Media

    http://www.street-level.org

COLUMBUS

DALLAS

  • Known as “The Texas Star” and “The Big D”
  • Overall population: 1,213,825 (as of 2005)
  • Senior population (65 years and over): 102,218 (as of 2000)
  • Youth population (18 and under): 316,612 (as of 2000)
  • Median household income: $37,628 (as of 1999)
  • Average temperature: 65.4 F
  • Homeless population: 14,000 (as of 2000)
  • Sports teams: Dallas Mavericks, Dallas Desperados, Dallas Stars, and Dallas Cowboys
  • Nonprofits:
        Feral Friends

    http://www.feralfriends.org/index.php

        Fine Arts Chamber Players

    http://www.fineartschamberplayers.org

        Boys & Girls Club of Dallas

    http://www.bgcdallas.org/

DENVER

  • Known as “The Mile High City,” the “Queen City of the Plains,” and the “Gateway to the Rockies”
  • Overall population: 557,917 (as of 2005)
  • Senior population (65 years and over): 62,673 (as of 2000)
  • Youth population (18 and under): 119,819 (as of 2000)
  • Median household income: $39,500 (as of 1999)
  • Average temperature: 50.3 F
  • Homeless population: 5,800 (as of 1999)
  • Sports teams: Denver Nuggets, Colorado Rockies, Denver Grizzlies, and Denver Spurs
  • Nonprofits:

DETROIT

  • Known as “Hockeytown, USA” and “Mo Town”
  • Overall population: 886,671 (as of 2005)
  • Senior population (65 years and over): 98,932 (as of 2000)
  • Youth population (18 and under): 295,844 (as of 2000)
  • Median household income: $29,526 (as of 1999)
  • Average temperature: 48.6 F
  • Homeless population: 13,000 (2000)
  • Sports teams: Detroit Tigers, Detroit Red Wings, and Detroit Pistons
  • Nonprofits:

LOS ANGELES

NEW YORK CITY

PHOENIX

PHILADELPHIA

  • Known as “The City of Brotherly Love”
  • Overall population: 1,463,281 (as of 2005)
  • Senior population (65 years and over): 213,974 (as of 2000)
  • Youth population (18 and under): 383,940 (as of 2000)
  • Median household income: $30,746 (as of 1999)
  • Average temperature: 54.3 F
  • Homeless population: 25,000
  • Sports teams: Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Eagles, Philadelphia Flyers, and Philadelphia 76ers
  • Nonprofits:

SAN FRANCISCO

  • Known as “The City by the Bay” and the “The Golden Gate City”
  • Overall population: 739,426 (as of 2005)
  • Senior population (65 years and over): 106,412 (as of 2000)
  • Youth population (18 and under): 112,626 (as of 2000)
  • Median household income: $55,221 (as of 1999)
  • Average temperature: 57.1 F
  • Homeless population: 6,248 (since 2005)
  • Sports teams: San Francisco 49ers and San Francisco Giants
  • Nonprofits:

b. Types of NonprofitsHOMELESS SHELTERS Homeless shelters are temporary residences for homeless people. Similar to emergency shelters, they are often located in urban neighborhoods, but are generally open to anyone, regardless of need. Some shelters do limit their clientele by gender or age. Most homeless shelters expect guests to stay elsewhere during the day, returning only to sleep, or if the shelter also provides meals, to eat; people in emergency shelters are more likely to stay all day, except for work, school, or errands. Some homeless shelters, however, are open twenty-four hours a day. There are also daytime-only homeless shelters: an option for those who cannot stay at their night shelter during the day.ANIMAL SHELTERSAn animal shelter is a facility that houses homeless, lost, or abandoned animals-primarily a large variety of dogs and cats. The animal is kept at the shelter until reclaimed by its owner, adopted by a new owner, placed with another organization, or euthanized. In the past, these shelters were more commonly referred to as “dog pounds,” a term that originated in the pounds of agricultural communities, where stray cattle were penned until claimed by their owners. Some animal shelters humanely euthanize animals that are not adopted within a set period of time; others have a policy of only putting down animals that are in distress due to age or illness.PERFORMING ARTS CENTERSOften abbreviated with PAC, a performing arts centers is a multi-use performance space that may be used by various types of performing artists, including dancers, musicians, and actors. Many PACs have performance halls designed for specific purposes such as symphonic music or chamber music.SENIOR CENTERSA senior center houses elderly residents nearing the end of their lives. Senior centers offer a variety of social and support services that help older people adjust to the changes the aging process brings, restores their sense of usefulness, aids in learning new skills, eliminates isolation, and expands their role in the community.YOUTH CENTERSYouth or community centers are public locations where community members may gather for group activities, social support, public information, and other purposes. Within the greater community, they are often open for specialized groups, such as youths. Specialized programming may include recreation leagues and tutoring. http://www.dosomething.org/karmatycoon

 

E-Mail karmatycoon@dosomething.org!

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