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Civil War Unit – Lesson D: Songs of the North

Subjects:

Language Arts, Music, Social Studies  

Grades:

4, 5, 6  

Title – Civil War Unit – Lesson D: Songs of the North
By – Sarah Higgins
Primary Subject – Social Studies
Secondary Subjects – Music, Language Arts
Grade Level – 4th-6th
Contents:

Civil War Unit
Lesson D

Objective: The student will be able to identify and articulate rallying points for the Northern side of the Civil War by reflecting this knowledge in a rhyming poetic form.

Materials: -Copies of Northern songs

Anticipatory Set: The student will be reminded on previous lessons and the course that the nation has begun to embark upon. They will recall & restate information from previous lessons.

Instructional Input:

Teacher Activities
Student Activities
-Ask the question-”From the information that we have received so far, what do you believe that the North will use as its rallying point? Are they going to fight to end slavery, or bring the states back into the Union, both, or some other reason?” -Discuss ideas with the class and in small groups.
-Remind the students of the importance of music during the Civil War era. -Give examples of the uses of music by both sides of the conflict.
-Ask the students to examine the songs from the North-”Always Stand on the Union Side” & “Union Dixie.” What rallying point do these songs use? -Find specific phrases and ideas that show what the men believe that they are fighting for.
-Ask the students to identify the main reasons that they would have agreed to fight in the war (if they would have agreed). What would their rallying point have been? -Discuss with the teacher about the reasons that they believe that the war should have been fought, or not fought.

Teacher Activities Student Activities
-Ask the question-”From the information that we have received so far, what do you believe that the North will use as its rallying point? Are they going to fight to end slavery, or bring the states back into the Union, both, or some other reason?” -Discuss ideas with the class and in small groups.
-Remind the students of the importance of music during the Civil War era. -Give examples of the uses of music by both sides of the conflict.
-Ask the students to examine the songs from the North-”Always Stand on the Union Side” & “Union Dixie.” What rallying point do these songs use? -Find specific phrases and ideas that show what the men believe that they are fighting for.

-Ask the students to identify the main reasons that they would have agreed to fight in the war (if they would have agreed). What would their rallying point have been? -Discuss with the teacher about the reasons that they believe that the war should have been fought, or not fought.

Checking for Understanding: During guided practice, the student groups should bring their ideas to the teacher for clarification.

Guided Practice: After the students have identified their main rallying point for the war, ask the students to compose a poem about their reasons. The teacher should demonstrate this concept by composing four lines of a rhyming poem in front of the class, with student assistance. Students should begin this process by writing down the main words or concepts that they would like to include in their poem. Next, these words should be grouped into categories of ideas and rhyming schemes. This process should be done in small groups of four to five students.

Independent Practice: The students should write their poems (8 lines or more). The students should feel free to ask their neighbors for help with rhyming words. Once the rough draft of the poem is written it may be passed into the teacher or into a peer-editing session for corrections. The final draft should be copied onto parchment paper and displayed in the classroom.

Evaluation: The students’ poems should be examined for ideas and content.

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