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Civil War Unit – Lesson E: Songs of the South

Subjects:

Language Arts, Music, Social Studies  

Grades:

4, 5, 6  

Title – Civil War Unit – Lesson E: Songs of the South
By – Sarah Higgins
Primary Subject – Social Studies
Secondary Subjects – Music, Language Arts
Grade Level – 4th-6th
Contents:

Civil War Unit
Lesson E

Objective: The student will be able to identify and articulate rallying points from the Confederate side of the Civil War through pictorial representation.

Materials: -Copies of Confederate songs

Anticipatory Set: The students are asked to recall the information that they learned in the previous lesson in which they were studying Northern songs.

Instructional Input:

Teacher Activities
Student Activities
-Ask the students what they know so far about the Southern states point of view. What made the states succeed? Is slavery the main issue? -Discuss with a few other students and report back to the class.
-Ask the students to examine the songs that were commonly sung in the Confederacy. (See appendix E-1 & E-2.) What do the songs point to as the cause for the war? -Pick specific words and phrases that refer to events that led to the war.
-Write these phrases on the board. Talk to the students about the feelings associated with music. Music can create pictures of events and ideas as people are listening to the music. Ask the students what songs bring picture into their heads. -Think of some songs that they can picture as they are being sung. Share these with the class.
-Tell the students that they are about to reflect on the songs that they have heard and read concerning the Confederacy and the Civil War. -Prepare to write notes about what they would like to depict from the songs.

Teacher Activities Student Activities
-Ask the students what they know so far about the Southern states point of view. What made the states succeed? Is slavery the main issue? -Discuss with a few other students and report back to the class.
-Ask the students to examine the songs that were commonly sung in the Confederacy. (See appendix E-1 & E-2.) What do the songs point to as the cause for the war? -Pick specific words and phrases that refer to events that led to the war.
-Write these phrases on the board. Talk to the students about the feelings associated with music. Music can create pictures of events and ideas as people are listening to the music. Ask the students what songs bring picture into their heads. -Think of some songs that they can picture as they are being sung. Share these with the class.
-Tell the students that they are about to reflect on the songs that they have heard and read concerning the Confederacy and the Civil War. -Prepare to write notes about what they would like to depict from the songs.

Checking for Understanding: Each student should have a chance to participate during class and share their ideas with their fellow classmates. If a few students are not participating, the teacher should check the drawings that they have made to check comprehension of the lesson.

Guided Practice: Pick one line from the song that clearly paints and picture and draw, paint, or construct this picture for the students. Mention that it is not necessary that the artwork is spectacular, but that the students have a chance to show all of their ideas. Give each student a large piece of construction paper and the instructions that they are to use the media that they feel would be most effective for their picture. Carefully watch the beginning of these pictures to see if students are struggling with the interpretations of the song. Students may want to discuss their ideas in small groups and decide how they would best depict their thoughts

Independent Practice: The students should work on their pictures with careful supervision of the teacher. Each student should construct a picture in such a way that it can be displayed in the classroom. (To expand the opportunity for students who prefer other methods of communication-give some students the opportunity to write their own song, perform a skit, etc.)

Evaluation: Check the students’ ideas that are depicted. Do they understand why the Confederacy decided to fight?

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