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The Olympics

Subjects:

P.E. & Health, Social Studies  

Grades:

3, 4, 5  

Title – The Olympics
By – Mark Brogdon
Primary Subject – Social Studies
Secondary Subjects РPhysical Education 
Grade Level – 3 – 5
This turned out to be a great program that I put together earlier this year at my school. Every class, in grades PreK to 5th grade, chose a separate country to study before the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. For a couple of weeks or so before the Games, each country studied in detail their selected country.

To culminate this, we held our own school wide Olympic Ceremonies on the morning the games were officially starting in Sydney. We started with the Parade of Nations. The emcee called the Olympic Roll Call and as each nation was announced, the “athletes” entered the gym carrying their nations’ flags and were all dressed in their nations’ national colors. Then, selected students gave brief speeches, basically telling about the important parts of the Olympics (what the rings stand for, the purpose of the torch, explained the mascots, and a history of the Olympics. After speeches, an Olympic Torch entered the gym and we “lit” a huge torch in the back made of tin foil and red, orange, and yellow streamers being blown by a box fan.

At this point, the games were officially started, and each country had an opportunity to compete in minigames in the gymnasium. Each class selected athletic events, and performed them in front of our audience.

After the games were over, a mock award ceremony was held, complete with medals and raising of the flags. At the end of the program, a closing ceremony was held and students demonstrated how the next country is officially awarded the next games, and we held the flag lowering ceremonies for that.

This is a GREAT program to boost interest in the Olympics. Our kids really got into the games this year, and we had kids pulling for countries such as China and Russia, simply because their class had studied them and competed as Chinese or Russian athletes.

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